D.C. Murphy. Rooster: A Badge, Gun and Heartache (2013) 285 pp.
Publisher’s description: “Corruption is everywhere. Near San Francisco, a small town is riddled with bad cops and cocaine dealers; Mill Valley sits nestled in the shadow of the Sleeping Princess Mountain in southern Marin County and, at first glance, appears to be a quiet, tranquil little town populated by rock stars, writers, and artists. But a closer look reveals a dark side: corruption has reached the top levels of the police department, and white powder cocaine is the locals’ drug of choice. Sean Patrick Murphy, nicknamed Rooster by his supervising sergeant, Dante John Castigari, is a burnt-out Irish cop on a rampage on San Francisco’s skid row. He carries a badge, gun, and heartache, but all he ever wanted was to be a country singer. But so far, that doesn’t seem to be in the cards. The year is 1978. But the story begins in Mill Valley, early in 1973: Sergeant Castigari hates dope dealers and dirty cops. So does Murphy, but his passion to become a country singer soon starts to interfere with his commitment to protect and serve. When Castigari plunges into the dangerous business of cleaning up the town and eradicating the Colombian drug cartel from their stronghold, Rock Star Hell, Murphy has to decide among his music, his job, and his mentor. The corruption and greed start to take a toll on everybody involved, including Murphy’s girlfriend, the sultry singer Peggy Sue Barnes. Then Murphy is offered immortality with a record contract; but not without a price. Soon Castigari is asking: Are you pulling pistols or strumming guitars? It’s down to the wire, but Murphy has already made up his mind. Now it’s a waiting game, and both the cops and the Colombians await Rooster’s next move.”
Setting: Mill Valley; San Francisco (1978)