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The Bancroft Library now allows personal cameras to be used in the Reading Room. There will be a $10 charge per day. Please refer to the Personal Camera Use page for further info on the Library's policies.


Duplication Services Unit

Introduction
Copyright Notice
Policies/Procedures
Services/Fees
Online Forms
Staff
Guidelines


Table of Contents for Policies and Procedures

General information, Definitions, Fees, Consultation
Duplication of Printed Materials
Duplication of Manuscript Materials
Manuscript Reproduction for Placement in Other Institutions
Duplication of Pictorial Materials
Duplication of Maps
Duplication of Oral Histories
Duplication of University Archives Material
Duplication of Audiovisual Materials
Filming in The Bancroft Library


General Information

Goals. Given that The Bancroft Library is a major research facility, that its collections do not circulate, and that many of its holdings are rare and often unique items, it is important that research copies be made available to the public if:

  • Photoduplication does not violate the "fair use" provision of Title 17 of the U.S. copyright law;
  • Photoduplication is not restricted by prior agreement with a donor; and
  • Photoduplicates can be produced without damage, or any substantial risk of damage, to the originals.

Any photoduplication request may be declined or truncated if, in the judgment of the Duplication Services Unit staff, if it fails to meet these conditions.


Definitions

Photoduplication is always used as a generic term for duplication by means of xerography, photography, or microfilming.

Photocopy is always used to describe xerographic reproduction.

Film or Microfilm is always used to describe 35mm silver-halide microfilm reproduction,whether original (negative) or duplicate (positive).

Digital scans refer to digital copies of Bancroft materials scanned to be 600ppi at 8x10 inches. Reproductions are available on a cd-rom or via email.

Personal cameras refer to digital and non-digital cameras that may be used in the Reading Room. Camera phones may be used only if the phone is in airplane mode. Video cameras are prohibited, along with the use of flash, tripods, and lights.


Charges for Service

Photocopies for on-site requestors are provided at the following rates:

  • 30 each: copies from individually cataloged printed works.
  • 60 each: copies from materials (including printed items) contained in manuscript collections,including those held in the University Archives.

Photocopies requested by mail are subject to a service fee of $20.00, which covers the costs of retrieval, copying and postage from a maximum of three bibliographic citations, as follows:

  • 1-50 copies from individually cataloged printed works.
    Additional copies are 40 each.
  • 1-25 copies from manuscript materials.
    Additional copies are 75 each.

The following additional charges may be levied:

Extremely large or complex manuscript orders may be subject to an Additional Labor Fee of $10.00 per hour, to be determined in consultation with the Duplication Services Unit staff.

Postage and Handling fees will be added to the cost of any order mailed to an on-site requestor. (Such charges are included in the service fee for off-site requests.)

Ledger-size paper (11x17") is available at $1.00 per copy for printed materials, and $1.50 per copy for manuscript materials. Use of ledger-sized paper is generally limited to photocopies of maps or other large, single-sheet items; it cannot be used to allow two-pages-per ledger sheet copying of large volumes.

For mail orders, 1-20 ledger-sized copies are provided under the $20.00 fee, with additional copies at $1.50 each; 1-10 manuscript copies are provided under the base fee, with additional copies at $2.00 each.

Fees for non-xerographic reproduction are listed under Photographic Services and Fees.


General Policies

Consultation and Referral
Duplication Services staff members are available for consultation with reference staff or Bancroft Library users on all questions regarding photoduplication.

Because a signature is required on all orders, requests for photoduplication cannot be taken over the phone. Callers should be advised to write:

  • Lee Anne Titangos if the request involves xerographic photocopies.
  • Lorna Kirwan if the request involves digital scans, microfilming of original materials, or duplicate microfilm.

Microfilm
Microfilm should not be regarded as an "easy" alternative to photocopying. In some cases, microfilming can cause more damage to a volume than photocopying. The chief advantage of microfilm is that it need be done only once, after which the original item can be retired from circulation.

Items which have been microfilmed may not be photocopied. PDFs of items on film may be generated by the microfilm scanning machines.

Estimates will be prepared for the requestor, usually within one week.

Prohibitions
All forms of duplication will be performed by Duplication Services Unit staff, or the Digital Imaging and Preservation Microfilm Labs. Arrangements may be made with the Head of Public Services, Susan Snyder, to facilitate large, complex or unusual requests.

Patrons may not use hand-held scanners, or any other duplication technology in the reading room.


Duplication of Printed Materials

Copyright Considerations
Conservation Considerations
Special Cases and Prohibitions

Copyright Considerations

No more than one-quarter of a book may be photocopied, with a maximum of 100 printed pages.

No more than one-half of a pamphlet (more than 32 pages in length) may be photocopied, with a maximum of 50 printed pages.

Broadsides, brochures and pamphlets of 32 pages or less may be photocopied in their entirety, if condition permits.

Books and pamphlets may be microfilmed in their entirety, if condition allows. Partial microfilming is not permitted for any reason.

  • NOTE: "Entirety" refers to a complete bibliographic entity. If a volume has been artificially created by binding together several bibliographically discrete items, the entire volume need not be microfilmed if only one or more of the titles is desired. However, each title must be filmed in total. For example, were six separately published plays by Lope de Vega bound into a single volume, each one of those plays could be microfilmed separately. But individual plays from a single volume Collected Plays of Lope de Vega could not.

No more than one copy per patron, of any sort, may be produced from any one original.

Conservation Considerations

Paper
Brittle, unusually thin, or otherwise fragile paper cannot be photocopied safely. Microfilming may also be precluded in such cases.

Binding
Books with loose, cracked, inflexible or otherwise unstable bindings cannot be photocopied. Microfilming may be possible in such cases.

Severely damaged books (loose sections, broken spines, etc.) cannot be accepted for photocopying on the assumption that "the damage has already been done." Microfilming can usually be recommended to produce a preservation copy.

Perfect bindings (i.e., unsewn single sheets glued into the spine) will not hold up under photocopying or microfilming. This is especially true of trade pocketbooks, thick pamphlets, and thin pamphlet folios.

Margins
Books or pamphlets in which the text is printed very close to (or partially bound into) the gutter cannot usually be photocopied or microfilmed successfully.

Size
No volume larger than 17x17" (reducible to 8x14") can be photocopied. Unusually thick or heavy volumes often cannot be photocopied. Most, however, can be photographed or microfilmed.

Plates and Foldouts
Plates which are loosely tipped-in cannot be safely photocopied.

Fold-outs which extend beyond the volume in only one direction can usually be photocopied. Those which extend beyond the volume on two or more sides cannot be photocopied, but photographs may be possible.

Special Cases and Prohibitions

Books
In general, books which are available elsewhere in the University Library system will not be photoduplicated.

Books assigned to the custody of The Bancroft Library by the Interlibrary Borrowing Service cannot be photoduplicated by Bancroft. All such requests are to be handled by IBS.

Objects from the BART collection may be photographed with the permission of the Rare Books Curator.

Many early titles are available on commercially produced microfilm or microcard sets in the Newspaper/Microcopy Room. Therefore, no photoduplication is allowed from Bancroft Library copies. The major collections of microfilm are:

  • STC film, containing works listed in Alfred Pollard's A Short-Title Catalogue of Books Printed in England, Scotland and Ireland, and of English Books Printed Abroad, 1475-1640 (Bancroft REF Z2002/P66/1926, and REF fZ2002/P66/1976).
  • The Wing collection, containing works listed in Donald Wing's A Short-Title Catalogue of Books Printed in England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and British America, and of English Books Printed in Other Countries, 1641-1700 (Bancroft REF Z2002/W56/1951, and 1972).
  • The Evans collection, containing titles listed in Charles Evans' American Bibliography: A Chronological Dictionary of all Books, Pamphlets and Periodical Publications Printed in the United States of America from...1639 down to...1820 (Main Reference Room E3/E8 Trade Case); and
  • The Wright collection, containing titles listed in Lyle Wright's American Fiction, 1774-1850: A Contribution toward a Bibliography (Main and Main Reference PS371/A12W9/1969).

The following items may not be photocopied or microfilmed without the permission of the Rare Books Curator:

  • Printed items before 1750.
  • Items marked "VAULT."
    NOTE: Reprints, facsimiles and/or microfilm copies exist for many VAULT items. Check OskiCat for alternate copies before referring the item to the Rare Books Curator.
  • Examples of fine printing or binding, e.g., titles housed in the Seminar Room (TYP AA1 A2, etc.) and most volumes in the TYP Z239.2 call number range.

Theses and dissertations housed in The Bancroft Library cannot be photoduplicated, unless it is the only copy available in the library system. Requests should be referred to the Duplication Services Unit.

Pamphlets
Individual items contained in volumes of bound pamphlets cannot be photocopied. Desired titles must be microfilmed in their entirety.

  • NOTE: Many volumes of bound pamphlets have already been filmed, in whole or in part. Check OskiCat before accepting a microfilm order or request for an estimate. In some cases, a second, unbound copy of the title may be available for photocopying.

Pamphlets in Gaylord (cloth tape) binders are generally too unstable for photoduplication. Disbinding may be possible in some cases; refer questions to the appropriate curator.

Most unbound pamphlets and pamphlet folios are suitable for photocopying. Exceptions are some Perfect bound volumes, and most side-stapled items, which tend to be inflexible and unstable.

Most double- and triple-folio pamphlets are unsuitable for photocopying, but can be microfilmed.

Newspapers and Periodicals
Bound newspapers cannot be photocopied in whole or in part.

Bound photostatic copies of newspapers may be photocopied in part, if size and condition permit.

Loose tabloid-sized newspapers may be photocopied in part, if condition permits.

Bound or loose newspapers may be microfilmed under the following conditions:

  • The entire volume (for bound newspapers) or run (for unbound newspapers) must be filmed. Filming of single or scattered issues is not permitted.
  • Bound newspapers often must be disbound or otherwise prepared for filming.
    NOTE: Some bound volumes of tabloid-sized newspapers may be filmable without disbinding. Such decisions are to be made by the Duplication Services Unit, in consultation with the appropriate curator and the Digital Imaging and Preservation Microfilm Labs.

Entire articles from periodicals may be photocopied, but entire issues may not (unless the issue contains only one article, and is 32 pages or less in length).

Because of their fragility, and ever-increasing demand, titles from the underground comics collection may be duplicated by microfilm only.

For conservation reasons, unbound issues of Playboy magazine may not be photoduplicated in whole or in part without the permission of the Head of the Public Services, Susan Snyder. Microfilm of Vol. 17 to the present is available in the Newspaper/Microform Room.


Duplication of Manuscript Materials

Copyright Considerations
Conservation Considerations
Special Cases and Prohibitions

Copyright Considerations

In general, documents may be copied in their entirety, unless restricted under prior agreements with donors. Most restricted files are so marked; consult with the appropriate curator if there is any question.

Printed materials housed in manuscript collections fall under the provisions outlined in Duplication of Printed Materials: Copyright Considerations.

The manuscript provenance stamp shall appear in red ink over a portion of the text on every photocopy, to prevent subsequent duplication of the material.

Conservation Considerations

In general, bound manuscripts may not be photocopied. (Note exceptions in Special Cases and Prohibitions).

Items in clasp or post bindings may be photocopied if the item can be safely disbound and rebound.

  • NOTE: Items fastened with ribbon, string or other unusual means generally can be disbound with the permission of the appropriate curator.

Most loose sheets or small stapled packets can be safely photocopied. Microfilming and/or conservation may be required if the paper is too thin, fragile, or damaged.

Special Cases and Prohibitions

Bound photostats may be photocopied.

Oral Histories follow the printed material pricing and policy guidelines.

  • ROHO: Bound copies of interviews conducted by the Regional Oral History Office are subject to the same conditions as other printed materials and treated as books. See Duplication of Printed Materials. Entire transcripts can be purchased from the Regional Oral History Office (486 Doe Library).
  • California State Archives oral histories may not be photoduplicated. Refer requests to the California State Archives (916) 773-8249.
  • Oral histories conducted by organizations not affiliated with U.C. Berkeley may not be photoduplicated.
  • Portions of University of California, Los Angeles oral histories may be photocopied. All other UC oral histories photocopy requests should be referred to the originating campus.

Photocopies of manuscripts not owned by The Bancroft Library, but housed in TBL collections may not be photoduplicated, unless otherwise noted on the appropriate manuscript folder or the OskiCat collection record.

Newspaper Clippings

  • Mounted newspaper clippings may be photocopied if the clippings are securely attached to loose sheets no larger than 11" x 17".
    NOTE: In many cases, the cellophane tape or rubber cement holding the clippings in place has deteriorated to such a degree that face-down copying is impossible. Consult with the appropriate curator to determine whether such clippings can be remounted or otherwise secured, at what additional cost, over what period of time, and for what form of photoduplication.
  • Loose newspaper clippings can be photocopied if:
    • no more than 25 clippings are requested;
    • all clippings are in good condition (i.e., not brittle, torn or separated);
    • all clippings lie flat (i.e., are not crumpled or excessively folded); and
    • no clipping requires more than one exposure.
      NOTE: Small clippings may be combined to fit onto single sheets at the discretion of Duplication Services staff. Ledger paper is available for large clippings, at 75 per sheet for LC call-numbered items, and $1.25 per sheet if from a manuscript collection.
  • Accumulations of loose newspaper clippings can be microfilmed, but additional labor costs may be incurred for preparation and mounting. Consult with the appropriate curator.

Scrapbooks cannot be photocopied, even if disbinding is easily accomplished. Microfilm can be ordered at the Special Handling rate.

In general, manuscript folders containing fewer than 50 pages of material may be photocopied in their entirety. Microfilming may be required in the following cases:

  • when a file contains more than 50 pages, and more than one-half is requested.
  • when a substantial portion of a significant correspondence or document is requested.
  • when the contents of the folder are widely disparate in format, paper or condition, and a substantial portion is requested.
  • when more than half of a small collection (in general, those housed in portfolios) is requested.

In such cases, refer the requestor to the appropriate curator.

Entire files which have not been reviewed by the requestor will not be photoduplicated.

Landcase files cannot be photocopied in whole or in part. They must be microfilmed in their entirety, along with all related landcase maps.

  • NOTE: Landcase film is listed in the microfilm binders under C-A 300, followed by the ND or SD case number. Check to see whether a landcase has been filmed before referring to Lorna Kirwan for an estimate. In many cases, the appropriate maps have not been filmed along with the rest of the landcase; it was not standard procedure previously, and records may not indicate the presence or absence of such maps.

Letterpress books (i.e., tissue-paper copies of documents) cannot be photocopied. They can be microfilmed at the Special Handling rate in most cases, but must be filmed in their entirety. Single pages can be photographed.

Non-manuscript Materials in Manuscript Collections

  • Printed materials are handled under printed material policies (See Duplication of Printed Material), but the photocopies are charged at manuscript copy rates.
  • Microfilm found in a manuscript collection can be duplicated if the item on film is also part of The Bancroft Library's collections, or is not otherwise restricted by copyright, or by public or private rights of ownership. Consult with the appropriate curator.
  • Photographs, original sketches and artwork are subject to the same restrictions as those in the Pictorial Collections (See Duplication of Pictorial Material).
  • Negatives larger than 4" x 5" can only be contact printed.
  • Objects can usually be photographed.

Photoduplication of architectural drawings is covered in the Guidelines section.


Policy Concerning Reproduction of Manuscripts in The Bancroft Library for Placement in Other Institutions

I. The Bancroft Library will consider requests from institutions to place in their collection copies of manuscripts owned by The Bancroft Library based on the following two criteria:

A. The requested material will augment collections specifically
pertinent to the regional or other collecting strength of the
requesting institution.

B. A quid pro quo policy can be established with the requesting
institution for acquisition by The Bancroft Library of a comparably
well-processed collection of materials.

II. All materials copied will be identified as owned by The Bancroft Library with copies provided for research use only. No further reproduction is permitted.

Written permission of the Head of Public Services of The Bancroft Library is required for publication.

III. Purchasing institutions will be charged not only for direct reproduction costs but also for special services entailed, such as review and arrangement of material preparatory to reproduction. Collections will rarely be copied if they have not yet been processed.

For materials reproduced on microfilm, the camera negative is retained by The Bancroft Library.

Manuscripts that might be damaged by copying or very large orders for materials whose size and complexity would unduly tax Bancroft's staff will be declined.


Duplication of Pictorial Materials

Photographs (i.e., emulsion-surfaced prints of any kind) cannot be photocopied. This includes most "viewing prints." Photographic reproduction is permitted.

  • NOTE: The photographs in the Chinese Subject binders at the Reference Desk may be photocopied at the printed material rate, as may the Honeyman viewing prints (BANC PIC 1963.002). However, requests for more than 25 such copies, or for any other photographic materials, should be referred to the Pictorial Curator, Jack von Euw.

Printed materials (e.g., postcards, engravings, lettersheets, or published items) may usually be photocopied.

Original drawings, paintings, prints and pictorial broadsides may not be photocopied. Photographic reproduction is permitted.

Patrons wishing to transfer pictorial images to film, videotape or electronic imager may make arrangements with the Head of Public Services, Susan Snyder. All such work must be supervised by staff. The charge for this service is $300.00 per hour.


Duplication of Maps

Maps up to 24" square may be photocopied if condition permits. Maps smaller than 11" x 17" will be copied on one sheet (8" x 11", 8" x 14", or 11" x 17"). Larger maps will be copied in sections, with a reasonable overlap, or large format photocopying may be arranged.

Rolled or bound maps may not be photocopied. Most can be photographed.

Sanborn map volumes may not be photocopied, even if the pages can be slid out of a plastic pocket.

Absolute legibility cannot be guaranteed for colored or tinted maps, or for pencil-drawn maps (especially those on thin or darkened paper).

Photocopies of maps are charged at the manuscript material rate.


Duplication of Oral Histories

Oral Histories follow the printed material pricing and policy guidelines.

  • ROHO: Bound copies of interviews conducted by the Regional Oral History Office are subject to the same conditions as other printed materials and treated as books. See Duplication of Printed Materials. Most transcripts are available online Regional Oral History Office (251 Evans Hall).
  • California State Archives oral histories may not be photoduplicated. Refer requests to the California State Archives (916) 773-8249.
  • Oral histories conducted by organizations not affiliated with U.C. Berkeley may not be photoduplicated.
  • Portions of University of California, Los Angeles oral histories may be photocopied. All other UC oral histories photocopy requests should be referred to the originating campus.


Duplication of University Archives Material

Printed materials from the University Archives follow the Duplication of Printed Materials policies.

Manuscript materials from the University Archives follow the Duplication of Manuscript Materials policies, with one exception: the manuscript provenance handstamp is not used on the photocopies.

All photocopies of University Archives manuscript materials must be reviewed and stamped.

Manuscripts submitted for various University prizes cannot be photoduplicated for anyone but the author.

Photographs in University Archives are subject to the same restrictions as those in the Pictorial Collections (See Duplication of Pictorial Materials).


Duplication of Audiovisual Materials

Copyright Considerations
Because the copyright law is far more restrictive (and vague) in the area of film, videotape and sound recordings, duplication policy forbids the copying of any commercially produced item. Therefore, all questions of audiovisual duplication should be referred to the Head of Public Services, Susan Snyder.

Procedures
At present, all duplication of audiovisual materials is performed by outside vendors. The patron must make arrangements for such duplication with the Head of Public Services, Susan Snyder.


Filming in The Bancroft Library

Filming of the exteriors of the UC Berkeley campus libraries is welcomed so long as the film crews do not block entrances or prevent Library users from easy access to the buildings. Approval to film in these settings should be sought from UC Berkeley Library Administration, University Relations and UC Berkeley Real Estate offices.

All filming requests within the Bancroft Library must be scheduled at least fifteen business days in advance of the requested date. Filming in public areas such as the Reading Room when the Library is open is not permissible. Requests for filming that supports the Library's mission and initiatives will be given highest priority. The successful scheduling of requested dates will depend upon the availability of rooms, the availability of Library staff, the amelioration of security concerns, the practical feasibility of the project, and an approved collection list.

When Library collections are to be included in the film, a very specific and detailed list of all items must be submitted to the Head of Public Service before a shoot date is arranged. Entire collections or containers will not be permitted. Research must be completed before material will be made available for a film shoot. The Library reserves the right to limit the quantity of material requested.

Arrangements must be made in advance when Library employees are to be interviewed or otherwise participate in the film.

There is a service fee of $300 per hour, including set up and break down. All film shoots must be completed before the building is closed by security staff.

Common sense and consideration should be used in photographing individuals. Photographs of individuals, particularly close-ups, may be taken only with the person's express permission.

When photographs or film are used for any commercial purpose, and certain other purposes, the Library requires credit in print and in any finished product. The Library also requires a copy of the publication or film be provided for inclusion in The Library's collections.


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