LINK: Exhibit Homepage LINK: The Early Years LINK: Selling the University LINK: Building The Bancroft LINK: The Directors
Exhibit Homepage
The Early Years
Selling the Library
Building The Bancroft
The Directors

Chronology

1832 Hubert Howe Bancroft is born on May 5 in Granville, Ohio, the son of Azariah Ashley Bancroft and Lucy Howe Bancroft.
1848 Bancroft leaves school to work in the book store owned by his brother-in-law, George H. Derby, in Buffalo, New York.
1852 On April 1, Hubert Howe Bancroft arrives in California, as the agent for George H. Derby, selects Sacramento for the book store. Derby dies of cholera on September 15.
1853 In May, seeking new opportunities, Bancroft leaves San Francisco for Crescent City, where he works as bookkeeper and bookseller.
1855 Bancroft returns to New York, where his widowed sister lends him the $5,500 he realized from the sale of her husband's books.
1856 Hubert Howe Bancroft opens a stationery and book business in San Francisco, in partnership with his close friend, George L. Kenny, under the firm name of H. H. Bancroft & Co., with offices in the Naglee Building, near the corner of Montgomery and Merchant Streets.
1860 Bancroft marries Emily Ketchum, of Buffalo, New York. They have one child, Kate.
1860 In looking over the reference works assembled for William H. Knight's use in preparing the 1862 Hand-book Almanac for the Pacific States, Bancroft first realizes the potential for book collecting.
1862 Bancroft visits Europe, including London and Paris booksellers, collects enough books on California and the Pacific coast to fill 12 packing cases.
1866-67 Bancroft and his wife spend nearly a year and a half in Europe, travelling and collecting more books for the library.
1869 At the auction of the great Mexican collection formed by José Maria Andrade, Bancroft purchases one-third of the 7,000 lots offered.
1869 Bancroft's wife, Emily, dies in December.
1870 The Market Street building is completed in April, and the library transfers to the fifth floor.
1876 Bancroft buys extensively at the auction of E. G. Squier's Central American collection.
1876 On October 12, Bancroft marries Matilda Cooley Griffing, of New Haven, Connecticut. They have four children: Paul, Griffing, Philip, and Lucy.
1880 Bancroft purchases $30,000 worth of Mexican and other Spanish American materials at the José Fernando Ramirez auction in London.
1881 The Bancroft Library moves into its own building at 1538 Valencia Street.
1886 The Bancroft Building on Market Street burns on April 30.
1887 The California State Legislature considers purchase of The Bancroft Library as an addition to the State Library; the issue is again considered and again rejected in 1889.
1892 A Joint Resolution is introduced in Congress requesting a report on the value of The Bancroft Library and whether it should be purchased for the Library of Congress.
1896 The New York Public Library considers and declines the purchase of The Bancroft Library.
1898 In response to a purchase offer, University Librarian Joseph C. Rowell evaluates The Bancroft Library at $116,000.
1905 Engaged by the Regents of the University of California, Reuben Gold Thwaites evaluates The Bancroft Library as worth at least $315,000.
1905 The Regents purchase The Bancroft Library on November 25 for $250,000, with Hubert Howe Bancroft making a gift of $100,000 of the purchase price.
1906 In May the library is moved to campus, with quarters on the fourth floor of California Hall. Frederick J. Teggart, Librarian of the Mechanics Institute, supervises the move and becomes honorary custodian, then curator (1906-1916). The Bancroft Library Commission takes charge of the library, beginning September 1906.
1907 Report of the Commission on the Future Organization, Maintenance, and Regulation of The Bancroft Library" is accepted by the Regents on September 20.
1907 The Academy of Pacific Coast History is formed to support and promote the library's affairs.
1911 The Bancroft Library moves from its attic quarters in California Hall to a room on the first floor of the new university library building, named for its benefactor, Charles Franklin Doe.
1916 Frederick J. Teggart resigns as curator of The Bancroft Library.
1916 Professor Herbert Eugene Bolton, historian of California and the Southwest, appointed curator.
1918 Hubert Howe Bancroft dies on March 2.
1919 Professor Henry Morse Stephens dies on April 16. The Academy of Pacific Coast History dissolves.
1920 Herbert Eugene Bolton becomes the first director of The Bancroft Library.
1922 The Bancroft Library relocates from the first to the fourth floor of Doe Library.
1940 Herbert Ingram Priestley becomes director. He came as associate curator in 1912 and had become librarian in 1920.
1944 Priestley dies. Bolton returns as acting director.
1943 University vice-president, Monroe E. Deutsch, chairman, presents the "Report of the Administrative Committee on Bancroft Library to the President," November 29.
1945 The Bancroft Library is placed under the direction of the General Library.
1946 George P. Hammond becomes director of The Bancroft Library on July 1.
1946 At a luncheon meeting on August 1, the Friends of The Bancroft Library is organized.
1947 Roscoe R. Hill, a senior staff member of the National Archives and a noted Latin Americanist, surveys the library and reports his recommendations.
1948 First Friends' keepsake is published: The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, February Second 1848, edited by George P. Hammond.
1950 The Bancroft Library moves into the newly constructed Annex to Doe Library.
1950 First issue of Bancroftiana appears.
1953 Herbert Eugene Bolton dies on January 30.
1954-55 Professor Lawrence Kinnaird is acting director from September 1954 until March 1955 while Director Hammond is on sabbatical leave.
1960-61 James D. Hart is acting director of The Bancroft Library while Director Hammond is on sabbatical leave.
1962 Custody of the University Archives is transferred to The Bancroft Library on October 1. The transfer was then formalized on July 1, 1963.
1963 James M. Cline presents "A Report on The Bancroft Library" on May 27, addressing several problematic areas of Bancroft collection policy and library administration.
1963 The Bancroft Library purchases the Robert B. Honeyman, Jr., Collection of Western American Art.
1965 Director George P. Hammond retires.
1965 A. Hunter Dupree is appointed director of The Bancroft Library on July 1.
1965 The Regional Oral History Office transfers to The Bancroft Library on July 1.
1966 Professor Dupree resigns as director in January. University Librarian Donald Coney is appointed acting director in February.
1969 Herman W. Liebert, director of the Beinecke Library at Yale, presents his recommendation for the merger of the Rare Books and Special Collections Department with The Bancroft Library.
1970 James D. Hart becomes director of The Bancroft Library on January 1.
1970 The Rare Books and Special Collections Department of Doe Library is transferred to The Bancroft Library.
1970 Mark Twain Papers become part of The Bancroft Library.
1972 The Bancroft Library moves into temporary quarters on the first floor of the library annex during the remodeling of its reading room and work areas.
1973 The Edward Hellman Heller Reading Room, centerpiece of a remodeled and expanded research facility, is dedicated on May 6.
1973 The History of Science and Technology Program is formally established on July 1.
1990 Director James D. Hart dies. Peter E. Hanff is appointed interim director, then acting director in 1992.
1993 Director Emeritus George P. Hammond dies on December 5.
1995 Charles B. Faulhaber assumes the position of James D. Hart Director of The Bancroft Library.
1996 The Bancroft Library acquires 61 volumes of original manuscripts containing records of the Mexican Inquisition.
1997 Michael Harrison Receives the initial Hubert Howe Bancroft Award, presented by the Friends of The Bancroft Library for significant achievements in support of historical research and scholarship and in the preservation of ephemera and memorabilia.
1998 With a gift from Stephen M. Silberstein, the University of California Berkeley Library and The Bancroft Library began an ambitious program to document The Free Speech Movement Archives are established to document the role of Mario Savio and other participants in the Free Speech Movement - a legacy that can still be traced in political activism and educational reform throughout the country. The Free Speech Movement project, in operation since July 1998, has established a comprehensive database, from which text and images of original documents are available online.
1999 Jean Stone, Philanthropist, receives the second Hubert Howe Bancroft Award.
2000 James S. Holliday, Historian and Author, is awarded the third Hubert Howe Bancroft Award.
2001 The Bancroft Library acquires the papers of Pulitzer Prize-wining poet, Gwendolyn Brooks.
2001 The Mark Twain Papers Project edits and published the authoritative text of Huckleberry Finn.
2001 Willa Baum, Oral Historian and former director of the Regional Oral History Office receives the fourth Hubert Howe Bancroft Award.
2002 John L. Heilbron, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of History, UC Berkeley, is presented the fifth Hubert Howe Bancroft Award.

LINK: Exhibit Homepage LINK: The Early Years LINK: Selling the University LINK: Building The Bancroft LINK: The Directors
Exhibit Homepage
The Early Years
Selling the Library
Building The Bancroft
The Directors


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