Foundations of Anthropology at the University of California   Seal of The University of California
Section 4 composite

Section 4 Composite
Kroeber, letters, Goddard

First Faculty Biographies and Images
Alfred Louis Kroeber (1876-1960)

Alfred Louis Kroeber (1876-1960)

Kroeber was born in New Jersey and studied English as an undergraduate at Columbia University. Inspired by a linguistics class taught by Franz Boas, he received Columbia’s first Ph. D. in anthropology in 1901. David Starr Jordan, president of Stanford, gave Kroeber a temporary job at the California Academy of Sciences, providing his first opportunity for field study of California ethnology. Upon Boas’s recommendation, in July 1901, Hearst recruited Kroeber as the first employee of the department she intended to give the University.

BANC PIC Kroeber, Alfred Louis--POR 4

Pliny Earle Goddard (1869-1928)

Pliny Earle Goddard (1869-1928)

Born in Maine, Goddard received a seminary education and came to California as a missionary in 1897. While at Hupa in northwestern California, Goddard renewed an interest in languages and in 1900 entered the University as a graduate student in linguistics under the tutelage of President Benjamin Ide Wheeler. He completed his Ph. D. in 1904, the first in linguistics the University bestowed. Wheeler secured a position of Goddard as Instructor in the newly-founded Department of Anthropology in 1901, where he remained until 1909.

Courtesy American Museum of Natural History

John Campbell Merriam (1869-1945)

John Campbell Merriam (1869-1945)

Merriam came to the University to study geology and botany from Lenox College in Iowa. After receiving his Ph.D. in paleontology at Munich he returned to the University as professor in 1894, as founding member of the Department of paleontology and active in the development of the Vertebrate Zoology and Paleontology museums. In 1920, Merriam left Berkeley to become director of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, a position he retired from in 1938.

Courtesy P. A. Hearst Museum