FRAMED ART

Introduction | Discovery | The Journey | In the Diggings and Towns | Those Who Came
Those Who Stayed Behind | Gold Rush Women | Families | Framed Art

William H. O'Grady
View of Downieville, Forks of the North Yuba River.
Lithograph, after 1849.

O'Grady was active in San Francisco in 1854-57 with a studio on Clay Street. This painting was published locally by lithographers Justh, Quirot, & Company.

B.V. Brooks
Pioneers Around a Campfire.
Oil on canvas, ca. 1830's.

A group of seven men around a campfire in a moonlit forest setting. One other man is getting pans at the left rear. B. V. Brooks is known only as the painter of this scene. Perhaps it is B. Vincent Brooks of London.

William Birch McMurtrie
San Francisco, View to the Plaza from Northeast.
Watercolor over pencil on paper, 1850.

An exceptionally important drawing of San Francisco with watercolor added to most of the pencil details (area at left rear unfinished), the artist is depicted sketching near a large tent. Hired as a topographical draftsman for the Pacific Coast Survey, he arrived in California in 1849, where he executed watercolors up and down the West Coast. His drawings were simply, accurate, and used little shading.

Charles Kuchel & Emil Dresel
Chinese, Tolumne County, Southern Mines,California.
Lithograph, hand colored, 1850's.

Kuchel immigrated from Switzerland to America in the 1840s and by 1853 had moved to San Francisco, where he became a partner with Dresel in a lithography firm that specialized in views of California cities and mining towns. Dresel had worked as an architect in Wiesbaden, Germany before joining the Gold Rush in 1849. He sketched throughout Northern California and Oregon in the 1850s and the partnership produced lithographs made from his sketches. Their views were frequently surrounded by a border of smaller scenes.

Ernest E. Narjot
Days of Gold.
Oil on canvas, 1884.

Two older miners and a young boy. Near the boy is a water pail and dipper. The mine opening in the right background is propped with timbers. A native of France, Narjot studied art in Paris before joining the Gold Rush in 1849. After three unsuccessful years in the Mother Lode area, he joined a mining expedition to Sonora, Mexico. He later returned to San Francisco in 1865 and set up a studio at 610 Clay Street. By the 1880's he was considered one of California's foremost painters. Narjot was commissioned to paint the ceiling at Leland Stanford's tomb at Stanford University and, while working there, paint splashed in his eyes. The final months of his life were spent in blindness, deteriorating health and poverty. He died in San Francisco on August 24, 1898. His works are rare since many of his paintings were destroyed in the earthquake and fire of 1906.

Chadwick (attr.)
Gold Mining at Sutter's Mill.
Oil on canvas ca., 1860.

With Sutter's Mill dominating the scene in the center, one miner pauses from his labor beside a frame building while another kneels with his bed roll burden near a "cradle."

Kuchel & Dresel
Mokelumne Hill.
Lithograph, hand colored, 1855.

Kuchel immigrated from Switzerland to America in the 1840s and by 1853 had moved to San Francisco, where he became a partner with Dresel in a lithography firm that specialized in views of California cities and mining towns. Dresel had worked as an architect in Wiesbaden, Germany before joining the Gold Rush in 1849. He sketched throughout Northern California and Oregon in the 1850s and the partnership produced lithographs made from his sketches. Their views were frequently surrounded by a border of smaller scenes.

N[athaniel] Currier
The Independent Gold Hunter on His Way to California.
Lithograph, handcolored, ca. 1850.

A rare hand-colored lithograph by Nathaniel Currier executed prior to 1857. It was then that his bookkeeper, James Merritt Ives became his partner, and the now familiar name "Currier and Ives" came into being.

Unknown
Gold Diggins of California.
Watercolor and pencil on paper, August 23, 1849.

Kuchel & Dresel
North San Juan, Nevada County, California.
Lithograph, hand colored, 1858.

Kuchel immigrated from Switzerland to America in the 1840s and by 1853 had moved to San Francisco, where he became a partner with Dresel in a lithography firm that specialized in views of California cities and mining towns. Dresel had worked as an architect in Wiesbaden, Germany before joining the Gold Rush in 1849. He sketched throughout Northern California and Oregon in the 1850s and the partnership produced lithographs made from his sketches. Their views were frequently surrounded by a border of smaller scenes.

Steven William Shaw
General John A. Sutter.
Oil on canvas, 1851.

Shaw had been living in New Orleans before joining the Gold Rush, and arrived in San Francisco in August, 1849, and mined for a few months before returning to art. He was a member of the 1850 expedition that discovered Humboldt Bay. In 1852 he established a studio in San Francisco and was much sought after as a portraitist.

Charles Nahl
Incident on the Chagres River.
Oil on canvas, 1867.

A flat boat being poled up river has hit rapids. One native falls overboard as passengers look on while other two boatmen try to pass the danger zone, dramatized by the previously wrecked boat seen on the flotsam-laden island. A native of Germany, Nahl was born into a family of artists in Cassel. He emigrated to New York with his half-brother Hugo in 1849, and in 1850 they went to work in the gold fields of California. In a few months, however, they resumed their profession as photographers and commercial artists in San Francisco. Nahl's works are among the best pictorial documents of life in mining camps in the early days, and he was one of the first artists in California to paint the unexplored peaks and vastness of Yosemite and the High Sierra. He died in San Francisco of typhoid fever in 1878.

Unknown
The Miner's Dream.
Oil on canvas, ca. 1860.

Henry Firks
San Francisco.
Lithograph, hand colored, 1849.

This view of San Francisco looking from Rincon Point (?) towards Telegraph Hill was lithographed in New York and San Francisco in 1849.

Thomas Hill
Byrnes Ferry, Stanislaus River, Calaveras County.
Oil on canvas, Early 1860's.

The artist in the foreground is sketching the scene described in the title, the river valley with ferry, and high buttes behind. For health reasons Hill was forced to seek a milder climate, and in 1861 Hill arrived in San Francisco, where he first advertised as a portrait painter. Later, after visiting Yosemite with William Keith and Virgil Williams, and exhibited Yosemite scenes at the National Academy. Although for half a century his panoramic landscapes were considered old-fashioned, today his work has regained its proper stature and he is considered a giant in American art.

F. Palmer
View of San Francisco, California.
Lithograph, hand colored, 1851.

Possibly Francis Palmer of New York City, but not to be confused with Frances Flora Bond Palmer, who made so many of the Currier & Ives prints.

M & N Hanhart
San Francisco (Sunrise).
Lithograph, hand colored, ca. 1850's.

Sarony & Major, Lith.
Grass Valley Quartz Mining Company's Works.
Lithograph, hand colored, December 7, 1851.

Napoleon Sarony and Henry B. Major were partners in New York City from 1846 to 1857.

Robert E. Ogilby
View of Grass Valley
Lithograph, hand colored, n.d.

Ogilby appears to have come to California about 1852 as a topographer. He was professor of drawing and painting at Durant University School and continued there after it became the University of California in 1868. He died in Oakland on March 9, 1884.
Introduction | Discovery | The Journey | In the Diggings and Towns | Those Who Came
Those Who Stayed Behind | Gold Rush Women | Families | Framed Art


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